Posts Tagged ‘bacteria’

‘Jailbreak’ Bacteria Can Trigger Heart Disease

Jailbreak bacteria cause heart attacksPlaque-causing bacteria can jailbreak from the mouth into the bloodstream and increase your risk of heart attack says a scientist at the Society for General Microbiology’s autumn meeting in Nottingham, UK.

Professor Howard Jenkinson, from the University of Bristol, explains how oral bacteria can wreak havoc if they are not kept in check by regular brushing and flossing. “Poor dental hygiene can lead to bleeding gums, providing bacteria with an escape route into the bloodstream, where they can initiate blood clots leading to heart disease,” he said.

Streptococcus bacteria commonly live in the mouth, confined within communities termed biofilms and are responsible for causing tooth plaque and gum disease. The University of Bristol researchers, in collaboration with scientists at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI), have shown that once let loose in the bloodstream, Streptococcus bacteria can use a protein on their surface, called PadA, as a weapon to force platelets in the blood to bind together and form clots.

Inducing blood clots is a selfish trick used by bacteria, as Jenkinson points out. “When the platelets clump together they completely encase the bacteria. This provides a protective cover not only from the immune system, but also from antibiotics that might be used to treat infection,” he said. “Unfortunately, as well as helping out the bacteria, platelet clumping can cause small blood clots, growths on the heart valves (endocarditis), or inflammation of blood vessels that can block the blood supply to the heart and brain.”

Jenkinson said the research highlights a very important public health message. “People need to be aware that as well keeping a check on their diet, blood pressure, cholesterol and fitness levels, they also need to maintain good dental hygiene to minimize their risk of heart problems.”

The team is using a brand-new blood flow model, developed by Dr. Steve Kerrigan at the RCSI, School of Pharmacy, Dublin, that mimics conditions in the human circulatory system. “We are currently investigating how the platelet-activating function of PadA can be blocked. This could eventually lead to new treatments for cardiovascular disease which is the biggest killer in the developed world,” said Jenkinson.

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/news/2010/09/jailbreak-bacteria-can-trigger-heart-disease

Note: CulturedCare Probiotic Gum with BLIS K12 has a positive effect on dental hygiene. The friendly probiotic bacteria BLIS K12 has been shown to successfully fight harmful Streptococcus bacteria in the mouth. Dentists and dental hygienists everywhere are now recommending oral probiotics as part of a systemic approach to health and dentistry.

Study Looks at Why Mum’s Kiss is Good for Baby (While Other Story Argues Opposite)

(NOTE: The following news article came out on the heels of an MSNBC story titled “Mom’s kiss can spread cavities to baby,” which argues that moms should be careful about spreading bacteria through kisses. The story below points out that some bacteria, like BLIS K12, actually protects baby.)

Study Looks at Why Mum’s Kiss is Good for Baby

by Eileen Goodwin
nzherald.co.nz
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10652667

swab-220Encouraging a mother to spit on her baby may not sound like good science, but it is the basis of a world-first study in New Zealand.

The University of Otago study aims to determine if newborns can receive, and establish, good bacteria that have been introduced to their mother’s mouths.

Pregnant women will suck a probiotic lozenge each day of the last month of their pregnancy to colonise their mouths with the bacteria associated with preventing sore throats and ear infections.

“There has been no study like this before,” Professor John Tagg said.

Women would be checked to see if they naturally carried streptococcus salivarius K12, which occurs naturally in 5 per cent of the population.

Why some people had K12 was a mystery; it was random, but there were indications it ran in families.

“What we want is to take the randomness out of it,” he said.

If his theory is right, his method will establish the good bacteria, potentially with life-long benefits.

“When she kisses baby, it should give the kiss of protection to her baby.”

The study is based on the same principle as Blis K12 Throat Guard, which Professor Tagg developed.

Only two participants were signed up for the trial, but Professor Tagg hoped about 50 women would take part over the next year.

Sterile when they were born, babies inherited bacteria from their main carer, usually their mother.

The person who got the most “spits in” passed on their bacteria to the baby. Babies would be checked for K12 at one week, and then at six weeks, to see if the bacteria remained.

The babies would not be tracked as they grew up, but that could be the basis of future research, Professor Tagg said.

Dunedin mother-of-three Anna Wescombe, who is six-and-a-half months pregnant, was pleased to be taking part in the study.

Hopefully her baby would benefit from the “good bacteria”, Mrs Wescombe said.

By Eileen Goodwin

PS – Here’s a video of Professor Tagg on the protective qualities of a mother’s kiss:

Ask Professor Tagg – “BLIS K12 Probiotic Gum for Sjogren’s Syndrome?”

(Do you have a Probiotic Health question for Professor John Tagg? Email us your question. If your question is not listed in our FAQ’s, we’ll ask Professor Tagg directly, email you back with his answer, AND post it here on our blog to benefit all our readers.)

Reader’s Question:

What about this gum for persons with Sjogren’s Syndrome? It’s an autoimmune disease which damages the moisture producing glands including the salivary glands. Excessive bacteria is a problem for persons with Sjogren’s due to lack of saliva. Thrush and oral yeast infections are regular issues. How would your gum work for that?

Professor John Tagg’s Answer:

Indeed the Probiotic Gum is perfectly applicable to individuals experiencing the hyposalivation of Sjogren’s Syndrome. The chewing of the gum not only will help stimulate saliva production but the release of BLIS K12 and subsequent colonisation will help counter oral thrush as the K12 cells occupy space on the mucosal surfaces that otherwise is vulnerable to fungal infiltration.

“BLIS K12 fights Bad Breath” VIDEO w/ Professor John Tagg

In this video, Professor John Tagg from Otago University talks briefly about how probiotic S. salivarius BLIS K12 fights the bacteria that cause bad breath.

How Can You Colonize Healthy Probiotic Bacteria in Your Mouth?

We’ve all heard that “Digestion starts in the mouth.” But probiotic supplements like acidophilus have typically targeted only the lower intestinal tract. BLIS K12 is different. It is a probiotic for the mouth. It doesn’t pass through the stomach and live in the lower intestine like other probiotics. It stays in the mouth, colonizing on your tongue and protecting against infection where it most often enters the body… through the mouth and nose.

So how can you colonize friendly BLIS K12 probiotic bacteria in your mouth and start benefiting from the “infection protection” it provides? In this video, Professor John Tagg gives the short answer to this question, while pointing out that the mouth is actually the beginning or “front” of the intestinal tract, with its own unique flora.

Strep Throat Prevention with Probiotics

Anyone who has ever had a strep throat infection knows how painful it is. But did you know that the bacteria that causes strep throat, Streptococcus pyogenes is also highly contagious and in severe infections may lead to rheumatic fever and kidney disease?
Once you have strep throat, the surest way to beat it is with antibiotics.
But how can you PREVENT it? And after you take antibiotics, what can you do to replenish the friendly bacteria that have been killed?
Professor John Tagg in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Otago knows how. He studied Streptococci bacterium for more than 30 years, looking for friendly strep bacteria that would control and destroy the harmful strep bacteria before it colonizes to the degree that it causes a strep throat infection. And, after 30 years of research, he found it and named it BLIS K12.
While Streptococcus pyogenes is the highly contagious, bad guy (pathogen) that causes strep throat, a closely related “cousin,” Streptococcus salivarius, is a good guy that  inhabits (colonizes) the mouths of healthy, infection-resistant people. Professor Tagg discovered a component of Streptococcus salivarius – BLIS K12 – that has unique infection-fighting powers in the mouth where infections enter and take a hold.  His research showed that BLIS K12, a naturally occurring oral probiotic (a probiotic that lives only in the mouth) destroys and renders harmless the infection- causing Streptococcus pyogenes.
To prevent strep throat and after taking antibiotics, Professor Tagg recommends chewing one piece of CulturedCare Probiotic Gum with BLIS K12 every day in order to recolonize and sustain healthy levels of  this probiotic that lives in our mouth and fights strep throat.
Anyone who has ever suffered the pain of a strep throat infection will appreciate just how big a discovery this was!
Along with preventing strep throat, Professor Tagg’s BLIS K12 has also been shown to combat the unfriendly bacteria that cause bad breath (halitosis), ear aches and upper respiratory infections.

Anyone who has ever had a strep throat infection knows how painful it is. But did you know that the bacteria that causes strep throat, Streptococcus pyogenes is also highly contagious and in severe infections may lead to rheumatic fever and kidney disease?

Once you have strep throat, the surest way to beat it is with antibiotics.

But how can you PREVENT it? And after you take antibiotics, what can you do to replenish the friendly bacteria that have been killed?

Professor John Tagg in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Otago knows how. He studied Streptococci bacterium for more than 30 years, looking for friendly strep bacteria that would control and destroy the harmful strep bacteria before it colonizes to the degree that it causes a strep throat infection. And, after 30 years of research, he found it and named it BLIS K12.

While Streptococcus pyogenes is the highly contagious, bad guy (pathogen) that causes strep throat, a closely related “cousin,” S. salivarius, is a good guy that  inhabits (colonizes) the mouths of healthy, infection-resistant people. Professor Tagg discovered a component of S. salivarius – BLIS K12 – that has unique infection-fighting powers in the mouth where infections enter and take a hold.  His research showed that BLIS K12, a naturally occurring oral probiotic (a probiotic that lives only in the mouth) destroys and renders harmless the infection- causing Streptococcus pyogenes.

To prevent strep throat and after taking antibiotics, Professor Tagg recommends chewing one piece of CulturedCare Probiotic Gum with BLIS K12 every day in order to recolonize and sustain healthy levels of  this probiotic that lives in our mouth and fights strep throat.

Anyone who has ever suffered the pain of a strep throat infection will appreciate just how big a discovery this was!

Along with preventing strep throat, Professor Tagg’s BLIS K12 has also been shown to combat the unfriendly bacteria that cause bad breath (halitosis), ear aches and upper respiratory infections.