Posts Tagged ‘infection’

Part 2 – Probiotics For Your Mouth – John Tagg, Strep and the BLIS K12 Story

Professor John Tagg of Otago University (NZ) tells his story of studying 100 school age children for 6 years. Ten of these 100 children did not get a strep throat infection over the course of the study. Tagg and his team discovered that these 10 children had a special “friendly” probiotic bacteria (S. salivarius) colonized in their mouth that was protecting them against strep throat infection (Streptococcus pyogenes) by producing powerful infection-fighting molecules that John Tagg eventually named “BLIS K12.”

We’ll be featuring more video segments with leading probiotic researcher Professor John Tagg over the next few weeks.

Please post your questions and comments in the comments section and we’ll be sure to respond!

BLIS K12 – “Hundreds of times more effective than even most traditional antiseptic throat lozenges”

BLIS K12 is the world’s only probiotic specifically designed to protect the entire oral cavity which includes the throat, mouth, gums and teeth. Under specific conditions, it has even been shown to protect the nasal sinus from infection.   BLIS K12 is known as an advanced probiotic, because unlike other probiotic organisms, it will produce antibacterial peptides (called BLIS) when it is under threat from a potential disease-causing bacteria. Studies on the potency of the antibacterial effect of the advanced probiotic organism demonstrates that it is hundreds of times more effective than even most traditional antiseptic throat lozenges if used as an oral antiseptic.
Jocelyn Mathern, (M.S., R.D.), Technical Health Manager for Frutarom, reported that a research group from the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, recently published a paper on the unique properties of the organism BLIS K12, in the scientific journal from the American Society of Microbiology,  called “Infection and Immunity”. The research paper went beyond examining the classic probiotic activity of certain bacteria to determine if the BLIS K12 probiotic conferred any additional benefit, simply by colonizing in the oral cavity.
“What’s exciting about this research is that it showed that BLIS K12 exhibited a pronounced anti-inflammatory effect and this was directly related to its interaction and colonization with its host (i.e. the person taking it). This demonstrates that the human body actually responds in positive and beneficial ways, in the presence of BLIS K12, unlike many of the other bacteria that can be found within the human body.”  Mathern said.  “Additionally the study also suggested that the BLIS K12 could switch on the genes in the epithelial tissue that are responsible for cellular rebuilding and repair, especially after a cell has been damaged by a pathogen.”
The research group that investigated BLIS K12 took several months to complete their work and involved researchers from the University of British Columbia (Canada), University of Leeds (UK), Inimex Pharmaceuticals (Canada), and the University of Otago (New Zealand). They now confirm that the beneficial effects of the probiotic BLIS K12 goes  beyond the unique ability to produce its well-known, anti-bacterial peptides  (called BLIS), which are clinically demonstrated  to kill bacteria implicated in upper airways infection, chronic bad breath and bacterial infections of the oral cavity.  “We know that BLIS K12 has protective benefits against sore throats and upper respiratory infections, but this research suggests that if you are already sick, BLIS K12 can stimulate an immune response to help a person recover faster,” stated Mathern.
Just prior to this publication from the group at the University of British Columbia, another important study appeared in the European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases.  In this earlier study it was suggested that the advanced probiotic, BLIS K12, could exert a long term protective effect upon the upper respiratory tract (ear, nose and throat) if the subjects sucked on a series of BLIS K12 lozenges immediately after a course of antibiotics. The study suggested that BLIS K12 had the potential for unique application of protection against ear infections in children.
INFECTION AND IMMUNITY,      Sept. 2008, p. 4163–4175 Vol. 76, No. 9
DR. M. ROHDE, HELMHOLTZ CENTRE FOR INFECTION RESEARCH,  Braunschweig, Germany
MICROBE Oct 2008, Commentary on Infect. Immun. 76:4163–4175
EUR J CLIN MICROBIOL INFECT DIS,    DOI 10.1007/S10096-008-0569-4
BLIS K12

BLIS K12

BLIS K12 is the world’s only probiotic specifically designed to protect the entire oral cavity which includes the throat, mouth, gums and teeth. Under specific conditions, it has even been shown to protect the nasal sinus from infection.   BLIS K12 is known as an advanced probiotic, because unlike other probiotic organisms, it will produce antibacterial peptides (called BLIS) when it is under threat from a potential disease-causing bacteria. Studies on the potency of the antibacterial effect of the advanced probiotic organism demonstrates that it is hundreds of times more effective than even most traditional antiseptic throat lozenges if used as an oral antiseptic.

Jocelyn Mathern, (M.S., R.D.), Technical Health Manager for Frutarom, reported that a research group from the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, recently published a paper on the unique properties of the organism BLIS K12, in the scientific journal from the American Society of Microbiology,  called “Infection and Immunity”. The research paper went beyond examining the classic probiotic activity of certain bacteria to determine if the BLIS K12 probiotic conferred any additional benefit, simply by colonizing in the oral cavity.

“What’s exciting about this research is that it showed that BLIS K12 exhibited a pronounced anti-inflammatory effect and this was directly related to its interaction and colonization with its host (i.e. the person taking it). This demonstrates that the human body actually responds in positive and beneficial ways, in the presence of BLIS K12, unlike many of the other bacteria that can be found within the human body.”  Mathern said.  “Additionally the study also suggested that the BLIS K12 could switch on the genes in the epithelial tissue that are responsible for cellular rebuilding and repair, especially after a cell has been damaged by a pathogen.”

The research group that investigated BLIS K12 took several months to complete their work and involved researchers from the University of British Columbia (Canada), University of Leeds (UK), Inimex Pharmaceuticals (Canada), and the University of Otago (New Zealand). They now confirm that the beneficial effects of the probiotic BLIS K12 goes  beyond the unique ability to produce its well-known, anti-bacterial peptides  (called BLIS), which are clinically demonstrated  to kill bacteria implicated in upper airways infection, chronic bad breath and bacterial infections of the oral cavity.  “We know that BLIS K12 has protective benefits against sore throats and upper respiratory infections, but this research suggests that if you are already sick, BLIS K12 can stimulate an immune response to help a person recover faster,” stated Mathern.

Just prior to this publication from the group at the University of British Columbia, another important study appeared in the European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases.  In this earlier study it was suggested that the advanced probiotic, BLIS K12, could exert a long term protective effect upon the upper respiratory tract (ear, nose and throat) if the subjects sucked on a series of BLIS K12 lozenges immediately after a course of antibiotics. The study suggested that BLIS K12 had the potential for unique application of protection against ear infections in children.

INFECTION AND IMMUNITY,      Sept. 2008, p. 4163–4175 Vol. 76, No. 9

DR. M. ROHDE, HELMHOLTZ CENTRE FOR INFECTION RESEARCH,  Braunschweig, Germany

MICROBE Oct 2008, Commentary on Infect. Immun. 76:4163–4175

EUR J CLIN MICROBIOL INFECT DIS,    DOI 10.1007/S10096-008-0569-4

(Full article at http://www.npicenter.com/anm/templates/newsATemp.aspx?articleid=22916&zoneid=8)

Strep Throat Prevention with Probiotics

Anyone who has ever had a strep throat infection knows how painful it is. But did you know that the bacteria that causes strep throat, Streptococcus pyogenes is also highly contagious and in severe infections may lead to rheumatic fever and kidney disease?
Once you have strep throat, the surest way to beat it is with antibiotics.
But how can you PREVENT it? And after you take antibiotics, what can you do to replenish the friendly bacteria that have been killed?
Professor John Tagg in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Otago knows how. He studied Streptococci bacterium for more than 30 years, looking for friendly strep bacteria that would control and destroy the harmful strep bacteria before it colonizes to the degree that it causes a strep throat infection. And, after 30 years of research, he found it and named it BLIS K12.
While Streptococcus pyogenes is the highly contagious, bad guy (pathogen) that causes strep throat, a closely related “cousin,” Streptococcus salivarius, is a good guy that  inhabits (colonizes) the mouths of healthy, infection-resistant people. Professor Tagg discovered a component of Streptococcus salivarius – BLIS K12 – that has unique infection-fighting powers in the mouth where infections enter and take a hold.  His research showed that BLIS K12, a naturally occurring oral probiotic (a probiotic that lives only in the mouth) destroys and renders harmless the infection- causing Streptococcus pyogenes.
To prevent strep throat and after taking antibiotics, Professor Tagg recommends chewing one piece of CulturedCare Probiotic Gum with BLIS K12 every day in order to recolonize and sustain healthy levels of  this probiotic that lives in our mouth and fights strep throat.
Anyone who has ever suffered the pain of a strep throat infection will appreciate just how big a discovery this was!
Along with preventing strep throat, Professor Tagg’s BLIS K12 has also been shown to combat the unfriendly bacteria that cause bad breath (halitosis), ear aches and upper respiratory infections.

Anyone who has ever had a strep throat infection knows how painful it is. But did you know that the bacteria that causes strep throat, Streptococcus pyogenes is also highly contagious and in severe infections may lead to rheumatic fever and kidney disease?

Once you have strep throat, the surest way to beat it is with antibiotics.

But how can you PREVENT it? And after you take antibiotics, what can you do to replenish the friendly bacteria that have been killed?

Professor John Tagg in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Otago knows how. He studied Streptococci bacterium for more than 30 years, looking for friendly strep bacteria that would control and destroy the harmful strep bacteria before it colonizes to the degree that it causes a strep throat infection. And, after 30 years of research, he found it and named it BLIS K12.

While Streptococcus pyogenes is the highly contagious, bad guy (pathogen) that causes strep throat, a closely related “cousin,” S. salivarius, is a good guy that  inhabits (colonizes) the mouths of healthy, infection-resistant people. Professor Tagg discovered a component of S. salivarius – BLIS K12 – that has unique infection-fighting powers in the mouth where infections enter and take a hold.  His research showed that BLIS K12, a naturally occurring oral probiotic (a probiotic that lives only in the mouth) destroys and renders harmless the infection- causing Streptococcus pyogenes.

To prevent strep throat and after taking antibiotics, Professor Tagg recommends chewing one piece of CulturedCare Probiotic Gum with BLIS K12 every day in order to recolonize and sustain healthy levels of  this probiotic that lives in our mouth and fights strep throat.

Anyone who has ever suffered the pain of a strep throat infection will appreciate just how big a discovery this was!

Along with preventing strep throat, Professor Tagg’s BLIS K12 has also been shown to combat the unfriendly bacteria that cause bad breath (halitosis), ear aches and upper respiratory infections.